SSL Report : www.linuxwebservertips.in

ssllab

 

 

 

 

This is a simple guide for setting up a strong TLS/SSL configuration on your server.

If you configure a web server’s TLS configuration, you have primarily to take care of three things:

1. disable SSL 2.0 (FUBAR) and SSL 3.01 (POODLE),
2. disable TLS 1.0 compression (CRIME),
3. disable weak ciphers (DES, RC4), prefer modern ciphers (AES), modes (GCM), and protocols (TLS 1.2).

 

Your Server’s Certificate

Let’s start with your digital certificate, which is at the core of HTTPS. The certificate enables clients to verify the identity of servers, through a chain of trust from your server’s certificate through intermediate certificates and up to a root certificate trusted by users’ browsers. Your server certificate should be 2048 bits in length. Using 4096 bit certificate is more secure however it require more computation times and hence slow compared to 2048 bit certs.

 

Basic HTTPS Setup

Here are basic SSL configurations, first for Apache:

;
...
SSLEngine on
SSLCertificateFile /etc/ssl/certs/your_cert
SSLCertificateChainFile /etc/ssl/certs/chained_certs
SSLCertificateKeyFile /etc/ssl/certs/your_private_key
<;/VirtualHost>;

And then for Nginx:

server {
...
ssl on;
ssl_certificate /etc/ssl/certs/your_cert_with_chain;
ssl_certificate_key /etc/ssl/certs/your_private_key;
ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:50m;
ssl_session_timeout 10m;
}

In Nginx, the ssl_certificate parameter is confusing. It expects your certificate plus any necessary intermediate certificates, concatenated together.

Make sure all of these files are at least mode 0444, except your private key, which should be 0400.

 

Software versions

On the server side you should update your OpenSSL to 1.0.1c+ so you can support TLS 1.2, GCM, and ECDHE as soon as possible. Fortunately that’s already the case in Ubuntu 12.04 and later.

On the client side the browser vendors are starting to catch up. As of now, Chrome 30, Internet Explorer 11 on Windows 8, Safari 7 on OS X 10.9, and Firefox 26 all support TLS 1.2.

 

Cipher Suite Configuration

The recommended cipher suites for Apache are follows

SSLCipherSuite EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH
SSLHonorCipherOrder on

The recommended cipher suite for backwards compatibility (IE6/WinXP):

SSLCipherSuite EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:AES256-GCM-SHA384:AES128-GCM-SHA256:AES256-SHA256:AES128-SHA256:AES256-SHA:AES128-SHA:DES-CBC3-SHA:HIGH:!aNULL:!eNULL:!EXPORT:!DES:!MD5:!PSK:!RC4
SSLHonorCipherOrder on

 

And here’s the same configuration for Nginx:

ssl_ciphers 'EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH';
ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;

The recommended cipher suite for backwards compatibility (IE6/WinXP):

ssl_ciphers "EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-GCM-SHA384:DHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA384:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:ECDHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA256:DHE-RSA-AES256-SHA:DHE-RSA-AES128-SHA:ECDHE-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:EDH-RSA-DES-CBC3-SHA:AES256-GCM-SHA384:AES128-GCM-SHA256:AES256-SHA256:AES128-SHA256:AES256-SHA:AES128-SHA:DES-CBC3-SHA:HIGH:!aNULL:!eNULL:!EXPORT:!DES:!MD5:!PSK:!RC4";
ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;

If your version of OpenSSL is old, unavailable ciphers will be discarded automatically. Always use the full ciphersuite above and let OpenSSL pick the ones it supports.

The ordering of a ciphersuite is very important because it decides which algorithms are going to be selected in priority. The recommendation above prioritizes algorithms that provide perfect forward secrecy.

 

Prioritization logic

ECDHE+AESGCM ciphers are selected first. These are TLS 1.2 ciphers and not widely supported at the moment. No known attack currently target these ciphers.
PFS ciphersuites are preferred, with ECDHE first, then DHE.
AES 128 is preferred to AES 256.  At the moment, AES128 is preferred, because it provides good security, is really fast, and seems to be more resistant to timing attacks.
In the backward compatible ciphersuite, AES is preferred to 3DES. BEAST attacks on AES are mitigated in TLS 1.1 and above, and difficult to achieve in TLS 1.0. In the non-backward compatible ciphersuite, 3DES is not present.
RC4 is removed entirely. 3DES is used for backward compatibility

 

Protocol Support: SSL or no SSL

To prevent downgrade attacks and poodle attack, we will also disable old SSL protocols

For Apache:

SSLProtocol all -SSLv2 -SSLv3

For Nginx:

ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;

This disables all versions of SSL, enabling only TLS 1.0 and up. All versions of Chrome and Firefox support at least TLS 1.0.